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    Contract negotiations continue hours before a deadline that will determine whether or not teachers in the Methacton School District will go on strike.

    The negotiations between the Methatcton School District’s Board of School Directors and the Methacton Education Association have been ongoing since January, 2017 as teachers seek a new contract. The teacher’s union said sticking points are over wages and insurance premiums. If a deal isn’t reached by 8 p.m. Sunday, teachers will go on strike Monday.

    The Methacton School District released its contingency plans in case of a strike. You can find a list of those plans as well as important contact information and a decision on whether or not classes will be open here.

    This story is developing. Check back for updates.



    Photo Credit: Methacton Education Association

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    When country music star Kenny Chesney lost his Virgin Islands home to Hurricane Irma, he didn’t get mad. He got even.

    First, he created the Love for Love City Foundation, which provides disaster relief for hurricane victims living in the U.S. and British Virgin Islands. 

    “I’ve never been in war, but the devastation, the people’s faces in a place I know by heart, have left me feeling helpless,” Chesney said. “It’s total devastation.”

    Donations can be submitted online or via check, money order or even cash, according to the foundation’s website.

    But the singer didn’t stop there. A few days later, he sent his private jet to rescue two brothers struggling to be reunited with their mother in Philadelphia.

    “We were in the shower laying down against the concrete wall and five minutes later the roof just ripped off our heads,” Jah-Haile Bruce told CNN.

    “I was terrified. I felt like Irma was a spirit. I saw the hand grab the roof and squeeze it and throw it off into the wind,” his brother, Jahbioseh Bruce, added.

    "It was crazy.”

    The brothers were told an anonymous donor had sent his private plane to transport them back to the U.S., but they later found out the aircraft belonged to Chesney.

    “I don’t even know what to say but thank you,” Jah-Haile said.

    This story is developing. Please check back for updates.

    [[445161603, C]]




    Photo Credit: John Hancock

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    What can be done to stop potentially-deadly hazing at America’s colleges, how should hazing be defined and how should universities go about reporting it?

    Those are some of the question the parents of Timothy Piazza – a Penn State fraternity pledge who died during an alcohol-fueled party – Philadelphia-based attorney Tom Klein and U.S. Rep. Pat Meehan, R-Pa., tackled on the Today Show Monday morning.

    "We're trying to do things that will make a difference, we are trying to do things to put an end to it," James Piazza told the Today Show's Matt Lauer.

    "Young people are impressionable and I have no doubt there are people that probably don't want to do it but feel the pressure that they have to... we need to break that trend," Piazza said.

    Piazza’s son, Tim, died in February after guzzling vodka and beer at a series of drinking stations at the now-closed Beta Theta Pi house at Penn State University and then falling head-first down the basement stairs.

    Following the death, Meehan introduced the Report and Educate About Campus Hazing (REACH) Act that is intended to put regulations in place that would require college campuses to report hazing incidents as part of a college’s annual crime report, building off the existing Clery Act.

    "Exposure, education, accountability - this pulls everybody into the dialog," Meehan said.

    Schools would also be required to educate students about what it means to haze and that they could be held accountable for subjecting fellow students to hazing.

    Rep. Marcia Fudge, D- Ohio, who joined Meehan introducing the bill, pointed out that hazing spreads beyond Greek Life on campus as recruits to athletic teams, marching bands and other organizations face initiation rituals as people look at joining groups for a variety of reasons from future endeavors to friendship.

    "We're talking about excessive use of alcohol, we're talking about sex acts, which are very common in these types of things... it is rampant on college campuses and it has to stop," Fudge, who herself is a sorority member, said.

    "This sends a signal, as much, to the fraternity councils and the universities to revisit the things that people have been doing to make sure they're not harmful," Meehan said.

    The fear, however, is that organizations with a tradition of hazing may be driven underground by the increased spotlight on fraternities and sororities.

    "There's a culture of abuse and there's a culture of recidivism that we have here and someone has to try and break it," Klein said. “Universities must own this problem.”

    Universities need to ensure that if hazing is reported that it's investigated, the panel said.

    "If people believe something will happen they will report it... I think that if people understand how serious this is and they can get some redress that they will report it," Fudge said.


    The education about hazing starts at home before students ever show up on campus. Parents need to not only talk to their children about avoiding situations where hazing might occur, but stopping it if they say someone being hazed, Tim Piazza's mother, Evelyn, said.

    "As a parent you need to have that conversation with your child to say 'it's unacceptable, under no circumstance is hazing acceptable,'" Evelyn Piazza said.

    "The message to the children is if it doesn't feel right, if it doesn't look right, get out," James Piazza said.

    Meehan and Fudge say it shouldn’t be on the students and their families to sort out “substantial risk” of hazing within organizations but rather the colleges to change the climate and root out bad actors.

    "The university has to have policies in place that are so strict that people know that if I get caught doing this I can be expelled, I can be prosecuted," Fudge said.

    There is one thing that everyone agrees can help spot hazing that falls through the cracks.

    "Talk to your kids be open and honest and convince them that they can tell you anything,” James Piazza said.



    Photo Credit: Patrick Carns/AP
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    This Oct. 31, 2014, photo provided by Patrick Carns shows Timothy Piazza, center, with his parents Evelyn Piazza, left, and James Piazza, right, during Hunterdon Central Regional High School football's This Oct. 31, 2014, photo provided by Patrick Carns shows Timothy Piazza, center, with his parents Evelyn Piazza, left, and James Piazza, right, during Hunterdon Central Regional High School football's "Senior Night" at the high school's stadium in Flemington, New Jersey. Prosecutors announced Friday, May 5, 2017 that up to 18 students at Penn State University face charges in the death of Timothy Piazza, who died in February during an alcohol-fueled fraternity pledge ceremony.

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    Toys R Us, which reportedly faces a large debt load as it heads into the new year, could file for bankruptcy by the end of the week, sources familiar with the matter told CNBC.

    The sources said that plans to file for bankruptcy are not set in stone, and if it does go through, the timing could change.

    Declaring bankruptcy would simplify Toys R Us' capital structure, complicated by its three owners — none of whom commented to CNBC.

    Doing so would give vendors like Mattel and Hasbro clarity as the holiday season approaches.



    Photo Credit: Carolyn Kaster/AP, File

    This Nov. 26, 2009, file photo shows a line of Black Friday holiday shoppers wrapping around the Toys This Nov. 26, 2009, file photo shows a line of Black Friday holiday shoppers wrapping around the Toys "R" Us in Camp Hill, Pa.

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    Watch NBC10 News Live at 4 in the video embedded above to track the storms.


    One Atlantic Ocean hurricane is going to impact our area as another intensifies as its heads toward Puerto Rico.

    The NBC10 First Alert Weather Team issued a First Alert starting Monday evening through Thursday morning for the Jersey Shore and Delaware beaches due to the effects of Hurricane Jose, which is far off the coast and not expected to hit our area.

    Here is what you can expect from Jose, which was a Category 1 storm with 75 mph sustained winds as of midday Monday:

    • On-and-off rain for Philadelphia, the immediate suburbs and South Jersey Tuesday and Wednesday. Possible heavy downpours and steady rain closer to the coastline.
    • Potentially life-threatening rip current risk due to rough seas. Waves could break at 10 to 15 feet. So stay out of the ocean.
    • There is also a risk of minor coastal flooding with some moderate tidal flooding Tuesday evening and beach erosion. Winds along the coast could gust to 40 to 50 mph.
    • A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect along the coast.

    "The whole area may feel effects of Jose but the exact impact varies greatly from neighborhood to neighborhood," meteorologist Krystal Klei says.

    As we keep an eye on Jose, Hurricane Maria has intensified into a Category 3 storm as it heads toward the Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. Here’s what to expect from Maria:

    • Likely will intensify to Category 4 by Tuesday as it continues toward Puerto Rico.
    • The storm could hit Puerto Rico more directly than Irma leading to the potential for massive power outages on the island.
    • Maria is expected to remain a major hurricane into the weekend.

    Click here for the latest information in Spanish from Telemundo 62 in Philadelphia.

    The ultimate path of Maria could depend on what Jose does as it continues to move through the ocean, so stick with the First Alert Weather Team for the latest.



    Photo Credit: NOAA

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    When President Donald Trump visited CIA headquarters in the first weeks of his presidency, he toured the secure floor where agency officers direct drone strikes against suspected terrorists, current and former U.S. officials told NBC News.

    Impressed by what he saw, Trump conveyed to incoming CIA Director Mike Pompeo and the assembled agency officers that he wanted them to take a more aggressive posture, according to two current U.S. officials and one former official briefed on the visit.

    Soon afterward, multiple sources said, the CIA began carrying out drone strikes that might not have been authorized under the Obama administration, including in Syria, where the military has taken the lead on targeting militant leaders.

    The White House granted CIA officers more autonomy to decide on whether and when the U.S. can pull the trigger in various places around the world, including in Yemen, where the military carries out the bulk of the airstrikes, according to four U.S. officials who have been briefed on the agency's counterterrorism operations. The upshot is less micromanaging of targeting decisions by the White House, these officials say.



    Photo Credit: AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File

    A file photo of CIA Director Mike Pompeo answering questions while speaking at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) In Washington, Thursday, April 13, 2017. Pompeo has pushed for more freedom of action for the CIA, which Trump intends to give him, officials told NBC News.A file photo of CIA Director Mike Pompeo answering questions while speaking at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) In Washington, Thursday, April 13, 2017. Pompeo has pushed for more freedom of action for the CIA, which Trump intends to give him, officials told NBC News.

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    Roy Moore, the Republican frontrunner in next week’s special Senate election in Alabama, referred to "reds and yellows fighting" in a campaign speech, a video obtained by NBC News shows.

    Moore, the ultra-conservative former chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court, lamented racial divisions in his remarks on Sunday.

    "We have blacks and whites fighting, reds and yellows fighting, Democrats and Republicans fighting, men and women fighting," he said.

    "Red" and "yellow" are widely recognized as racial slurs.



    Photo Credit: AP Photo/Dave Martin, File

    In this Oct. 24, 2012 file photo, former Chief Justice Roy Moore poses for a photo in his Montgomery, Ala., office. Moore, an Alabama GOP senate candidate, used racial slurs in speech in a video obtained by NBC News.In this Oct. 24, 2012 file photo, former Chief Justice Roy Moore poses for a photo in his Montgomery, Ala., office. Moore, an Alabama GOP senate candidate, used racial slurs in speech in a video obtained by NBC News.

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    Wondering how to get to the NY Giants-Eagles' showdown? Don't stress. Your trip could be free. 

    SEPTA and Miller Lite are partnering up, for the fifth consecutive season, to give free rides on the Broad Street Line for the Eagles’ Home Opener. Yes, you read it correctly: free.

    The Broad Street Line allows access to Lincoln Financial Field, home of the Philadelphia Eagles.

    The free rides last from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on September 24, allowing for plenty of time to arrive at and leave the 1 p.m. game. Along with the free rides, SEPTA will be putting in ten extra “Sports Express” trips on the Broad Street Line starting at 10:10 a.m.

    The free service includes all fares or transfers.

    Services that connect with the Broad Street Line include:

    • Market-Frankford Line: Transfer to the Broad Street Line at 15th Street/City Hall Station.
    • Regional Rail: Riders on all lines can deboard at Suburban Station for easy access to the Broad Street Line at City Hall Station.
    • Trolley: Transfers to the Broad Street Line at 15th Street Station from routes 10, 11, 13, 34 and 36.
    • Bus: A number of routes provide connections to numerous stations along the Broad Street Line.

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    Police are searching for a man accused of trying to lure girls into his vehicle in Bucks County.

    On Sunday around 4 p.m., the Lower Southampton Township Police arrived at Park Lane in Feasterville, Pennsylvania after a mother reported that someone attempted to lure her nine-year-old daughter and her daughter’s eight-year-old friend into a vehicle.

    The woman said that a silver SUV pulled up next to the two girls and the driver asked if they wanted to go for a ride in his vehicle. The girls refused and the suspect drove away toward Bustleton Pike, police said.

    The girls described the driver as a black male with braided hair and wearing a black and gray shirt with sunglasses. They also said a woman was sitting in the front passenger seat of the vehicle.

    Officers checked the surrounding area but were unable to find the vehicle.

    If you have any information on the incident, please call the Lower Southampton Township Police at 215-357-1234 or submit a tip here.




    Photo Credit: Google Maps

    Police responded to Park Lane, Feasterville, Pennsylvania.Police responded to Park Lane, Feasterville, Pennsylvania.

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    A motorcyclist was struck and killed by a vehicle Monday afternoon in Feasterville, Pennsylvania.

    The victim was riding a motorcycle on Street Road and Central Avenue when he or she was struck by a car. The victim suffered severe injuries and was pronounced dead at the scene. The driver of the striking vehicle remained at the scene.

    Street Road is currently closed at Central Avenue as officials investigate the crash.



    Photo Credit: NBC10

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    Charges have been filed against a driver accused of speeding and striking a teen girl, causing her to fly in the air and land more than 100 feet away.

    James Clark IV, 32, of Abington, was arrested and charged with aggravated assault by vehicle, reckless endangerment and other related offenses.

    Police say Kelly Williams, 14, was walking across the marked crosswalk on Highland Avenue in front of Abington Senior High School back on August 23 around 2:45 p.m. when she was struck by a Subaru driven by Clark. The impact caused Williams to fly up in the air and land 102 feet away.

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    Investigators say Clark was speeding and driving at least 46 mph in a 25-mph zone.

    “This crash involving a speeding car and a girl crossing a street within a marked crosswalk happened right outside of a high school as teenagers were coming and going to sports tryouts, cheerleading practice and other activities that signal the beginning of the school year,” Montgomery County District Attorney Kevin R. Steele said.

    The unconscious teen was taken to Abington Hospital and later transferred to the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. She suffered lacerations to her liver, kidney and spleen as well as fractures to her T3 vertebrae, pelvis and leg. She also suffered a dislocated shoulder, eye and eyelid injuries, a concussion and multiple abrasions.

    Witnesses initially told police Williams was distracted because she was using the popular iPhone video and audio chat feature FaceTime on her phone. Investigators later determined however that the girl was not at fault.

    “Distracted driving and speed are a deadly combination," Steele said. "Drivers owe it to the community and to our young people to exercise extra caution and pay special attention to their surroundings in and around our schools.”

    Clark was arraigned and released on his own recognizance. His preliminary hearing is scheduled for October 11.

    Williams' parents released a statement Monday.

    “Our priority has been assisting our daughter in her recovery from the severe injuries she has suffered,” they wrote. “We appreciate the love, support and kindness we have received from our friends, family and members of the community.”



    Photo Credit: Montgomery County District Attorney's Office/Family Photo/NBC10
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    NBC10 Investigative Reporter Mitch Blacher spoke with SEPTA's Assistant General Manager of System Safety, Scott Sauer, about the precautions that SEPTA is now taking after the recent derailment incidents.


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    Major national airlines have warned travelers of possible flight cancellations and delays as Category 5 Hurricane Maria made landfall Monday in the Caribbean. 

    DeltaSouthwest and American airlines announced there would be no change fees if a flight was impacted by Hurricane Maria. All three airlines are updating their websites with the latest details on their flights. 

    Regional airlines in the Caribbean have also canceled or delayed their flights. 

    Maria grew into an "extremely dangerous" Category 5 storm with maximum sustained winds of 160 mph on Monday as it barreled onto the island of Dominica in the eastern Caribbean.

    Maria could hit Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands Tuesday night and Wednesday.

    President Donald Trump approved an emergency declaration for the island and ordered Federal Emergency Management Agency to assist the commonwealth. The declaration authorizes FEMA to coordinate all disaster relief efforts in Puerto Rico. 



    Photo Credit: NBC 5 News

    A Southwest Airlines plane with a blown tire makes an emergency landing at Dallas Love Field Friday morning.A Southwest Airlines plane with a blown tire makes an emergency landing at Dallas Love Field Friday morning.

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    Three people were arrested after police said they found a homemade flamethrower, bomb-making materials, dozens of guns and ammunition at the New Jersey home of a motorcycle gang member.

    The investigation began Thursday after the Monmouth County Prosecutor’s Office received information on a suspect storing explosive and destructive materials inside a home in Howell Township, New Jersey.

    Officers arrived at the home on the 100 block of Ford Road Friday and executed a search warrant. They then seized several firearms, ammunition and marijuana, police said.

    The investigation led police to the home of 49-year-old Anthony Corraro, a known member of the Pagans Outlaw Motorcycle Club, on State Highway 33 in Freehold Township, officials said.

    Police executed a search warrant and found the homemade flame thrower explosive materials, six long guns, 10 handguns,, and thousands of rounds of ammunition, including hollow nose and armor piercing cartridges, investigators said.

    Law enforcement sources said it was unknown what Corraro or the Pagans were planning to do with the arsenal, but they added that the gang has had recent tensions with a Hells Angels chapter in Newark. 

    Corraro was arrested and charged with attempted possession of explosives for an unlawful purpose, attempted possession of destructive devices for an unlawful purpose and other related offenses. 

    Police also arrested David Tash, 53, and Christopher Tash, 49, of Howell Township. Both men were charged with certain persons not to possess firearms, possession of armor penetrating bullets and possession of a large capacity ammunition magazine. David Tash was also charged with possession of over 50 grams of marijuana.

    The investigation is still ongoing. If you have any information, please call Detectives Wayne Raynor or Daniel Newman of the Monmouth County Prosecutor's Office at 1-800-533-7443.

    -- News 4 New York's Brian Thompson contributed to this report


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    A teen boy was killed while two others were injured during a drive-by shooting in Chester Monday afternoon.

    Police responded to the 1300 block of West 7th Street for a report of a shooting around 3 p.m. Monday. When they arrived they found a 15-year-old boy lying face down on the walkway of a home. Police say he was suffering from two gunshot wounds in his torso.

    The officers also heard an 18-year-old victim moaning and talking inside the house. Police say he was suffering from a gunshot wound to his upper thigh. Finally, police found a 16-year-old boy in the back of the home who had been shot in the buttocks.

    All three victims were taken to Crozer Chester Medical Center. The 15-year-old boy died from his injuries while the other two victims are in stable condition. The teen’s death marks the 23rd homicide in the city of Chester this year.

    Police have released little information regarding what led to the incident but believe it was a drive-by shooting. They have not released a description of any suspects.

    If you have any information on the shooting, please call Detective Michael Canfield or Detective Timothy Deery at 610-891-8030.


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    A boys' soccer coach from New Jersey has been arrested for allegedly head-butting an opposing coach, and hitting that coach's 9-year-old son, after a dispute over a game.

    Fair Lawn Police said Sean Cormack, 45, was arrested Sept. 10 for the alleged head butt of a 52-year-old coach from Midland Park "after a verbal altercation about the game."

    Police said Cormack first approached the Midland Park players; their coach intervened and said Cormack should speak to him instead. The confronation escalated from there. 

    When the Midland Park coach's son and others tried to break up the fight, Cormack allegedly struck the boy as well.

    The child was taken to the hospital and treated for dizziness. His father refused medical assistance. 

    Cormack faces two charges of simple assault.

    Attorney information was not immediately available. 



    Photo Credit: Getty Images / Chris Caesar

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    ANOTHER CRUSHING BLOW IN CARIBBEAN

    In this historic, horrific hurricane season, one monster Category 4 hurricane has hit in the Gulf of Mexico (Harvey), and the latest one in Florida (Irma). Each caused tens of billions in damage-and lives. Now the newest monster is causing another Caribbean catastrophe in islands just south of the ones crushed by Irma. It strengthened to a Category 5 Monday night. The first to be hit: Dominica is getting a direct, “Barbuda-like” blast. Close by will be Guadeloupe and Martinique.

    That small island just to the left of Maria’s eye is Dominica. Guadeloupe is the island just north of that; Martinique is the island just to the south. The only good thing about Maria is how small it is. The “donut of destruction” is only about 40 miles across, and the eye is barely 10 miles wide. But it is continuing to strengthen rapidly in the warm waters of the Atlantic.

    The next target, unfortunately, appears to be Puerto Rico. Although there were more than a million without power after the storm, the core of Irma’s strength passed north of the island. What is going to happen if a Category 4 or 5 hurricane makes a direct hit? No one knows how bad it could be, since the last Category 4 strike was in 1932. And there has been only one recorded Category 5 direct hit was in 1928. Maria is now predicted by the National Hurricane Center to take a direct hit as a Category 5. That is truly a worse-case scenario.

    You’d have to be in your 90s to remember a storm as strong as the one that may be about to hit. I say “may” because the computer models vary between a direct hit and a “graze” just to the north.

    The 48-hour position is very close to the island. And yes, the Virgin Islands are in the path-again. After Puerto Rico, the forecast tracks are a bit east of the Bahamas.

    THE “FUJIWARA” MOVE

    It might sound like we’re making this up, but there really is a Fujiwara Effect, named after the person who discovered it. When two tropical systems get too close to each other (about 800 miles or less), they start to influence each other. And, ideally, they actually start rotating counter-clockwise around each other. If one of the storms is much bigger than the other, the smaller one can get absorbed into the bigger one.

    Above is an example of the Fujiwara Effect from 2009 in the Western Pacific (the area with the most tropical storms on earth). Here is the write-up on what happened with these storms:

    https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/view.php?id=40615

    Here is the track of one of those “Super-typhoons”:

    (Courtesy Unisys)

    You might not be familiar with the map, since it’s the other end of the world. China is in the upper left, and the track of the storm came from the east into the Philippines. What you should notice is the consistent track to the northwest, and then the storm suddenly stops and GOES RIGHT BACK WHERE IT CAME FROM, before resuming the westward track. What made that happen? That was when the other Super-typhoon approached from the west, and the two storms rotated a bit.

    This is just one of a few Fujiwara examples I found, and some strange tracks happened as a result. Here is Hurricane Emmy from 1976, which was influenced by Francis:

    This is another example of a fairly typical track changed quickly, and then resumed when the two storms get farther apart.

    CAN JOSE AND MARIA DO A FUJIWARA? WILL THEY?

    There is obviously very little history of these strange movements. That makes it even harder to predict. I doubt our computer models will be able to handle it. Exactly when will Storm #1 start changing course? Will it strengthen or weaken? And what will happen to Storm #2?

    Here is the forecast map for the European model (the world’s best overall):

    This is a 132 hour forecast, so this is more than 5 day’s away (valid Saturday evening). Jose is on the right side of the picture, and Maria at the lower right. The storms are about 800 miles apart and seem to be similar size (the intensity may be quite higher for Maria, but it’s a small storm). If this pattern verifies, it would possibly lead to a Fujiwara. One thing that could happen is that Maria getting closer could force Jose to move toward the East Coast, while Maria turns more to the right. This would save the U.S. from the monster Maria, but increase the threat from Jose.

    This unusual pattern leads to even more uncertainty than tropical forecasts beyond 5 days (which are often iffy anyway). My advice is to be extra wary of any forecasts more than 5 days out with this pattern.



    Photo Credit: EFE
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    - (---), 17/09/2017.- A handout photo made available by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) on 18 September 2017 shows an image acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Suomi-NPP satellite of Hurricane Maria as it approaches the Leeward Islands in the Atlantic Ocean on 17 September 2017. Hurricane Maria is gaining strength and could directly hit Puerto Rico in the coming days. Several islands in the Caribbean, including Puerto Rico, are recovering from catestrophic damage caused by Hurricane Irma. EFE/EPA/NASA / LANCE Rapid Response MODIS / HANDOUT HANDOUT EDITORIAL USE ONLY/NO SALES- (---), 17/09/2017.- A handout photo made available by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) on 18 September 2017 shows an image acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Suomi-NPP satellite of Hurricane Maria as it approaches the Leeward Islands in the Atlantic Ocean on 17 September 2017. Hurricane Maria is gaining strength and could directly hit Puerto Rico in the coming days. Several islands in the Caribbean, including Puerto Rico, are recovering from catestrophic damage caused by Hurricane Irma. EFE/EPA/NASA / LANCE Rapid Response MODIS / HANDOUT HANDOUT EDITORIAL USE ONLY/NO SALES

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    Thousands of children in a Montgomery County school district spent a second day out of school as teachers in the Methacton School District continued to strike Tuesday.

    Teachers in the Montgomery County district walked off the job Monday after failing to reach an agreement with the district Sunday night. The contract covering about 400 teachers expired at the end of June.

    The teacher’s union said sticking points were over wages not being high enough to cover increasing health insurance premiums. The union planned to present a counter-offer to the district Tuesday morning.

    Striking teachers planned to picket outside schools again Tuesday.

    School Board President Chris Boardman called weekend negotiations "productive." But, while progress was made regarding salary increases, talks between both sides went south when they were unable to come to an agreement on how much teachers should pay for their health insurance.

    The parents of about 5,000 students spread across the district's seven schools must find alternate plans for their children again on Tuesday.

    "We don't want anybody to think we don't care about the kids and the education that they're going to get here," Diana Kernop of the Methacton Education Association said. "But our group is solidly together."

    Despite the union counter-offer, there is no set time for when both sides will return to the negotiating table. A state mediator has been coordinating exchanges between both sides, the district said.

    "We will be meeting as appropriate and hopefully within the next week we will be back together," Boardman said. "But we're all reeling from the shock of the whole message."

    The Methacton School District released its plans for the strike. You can find a list of those plans -- including options for temporary child care for elementary school students at the Audubon YMCA -- as well as important contact information here.

    The last Methacton strike in 1985 lasted 25 days.



    Photo Credit: NBC10
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    Some companies are so set on having workers who know just how their computer systems work that they're partnering with schools to start or invest in job training programs of their own, NBC News reported.

    Call it "new collar" jobs, as opposed to white collar and blue collar. They require some specialized education to get the job, but not a four-year degree.

    For example, Delta has partnered with 37 aviation maintenance schools to help shed light on the often-technical aviation maintenance technician job. A company executive said that the curriculum required by the Federal Aviation Administration is "very generic" and that it takes at least a year of working at Delta even with certification to be able to sign off on anything as an AMT.

    Nationwide, there were 6.2 million job openings at the end of June, a record high, and many of these openings are "new collar jobs that are unfilled as a result of an unskilled and under-skilled workforce," said Eugene Giovannini, chancellor at Tarrant County College in Texas.



    Photo Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images, File

    A Delta jet taxis on the tarmac at New York City's LaGuardia Airport in this August 8, 2016, file photo.A Delta jet taxis on the tarmac at New York City's LaGuardia Airport in this August 8, 2016, file photo.

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    Five football players at a Christian college in suburban Chicago face felony charges over the alleged hazing of a freshman teammate last year, authorities confirmed.

    A judge issued arrest warrants Monday for Wheaton College students James Cooksey, Kyler Kregel, Benjamin Pettway, Samuel TeBos and Noah Spielman.

    Spielman is the son of former NFL star Chris Spielman. An attorney for the Ohio State linebacking great said the family is surprised by the charges and called the allegations against his son "inaccurate and sensationalized."

    "Chris and his family were shocked to hear of these charges after an investigation by Wheaton College exonerated these gentlemen over one year ago," the statement read. "The initial print reporting has been inaccurate and sensationalized as Noah has, and will, cooperate with authorities moving forward in the legal process."

    Prosecutors charged the five players with aggravated battery, mob action and unlawful restraint.

    The victim told police he was in his dormitory room in March 2016 when the players tackled and duct taped the freshman, put a pillowcase over his head and threw him in a vehicle, the Chicago Tribune reported, citing court documents describing the victim’s statements to investigators. The student told investigators they attempted to sodomize him with an object and dumped his half-naked and beaten body in an off-campus field.

    The freshman ultimately took himself to a hospital with muscle tears in both shoulders and various bruises and scratches, the Tribune reports.

    The publication said it obtained the records after the Wheaton police department declined this year to release the report under the state’s Freedom of Information Act. The Tribune did not say how it obtained the report.

    The victim withdrew from the school not long after, according to the publication. 

    He told the Tribune in a statement that the incident "has had a devastating effect on my life."

    The college said in a statement late Monday night that it conducted its own investigation into the hazing claims, which "resulted in a range of corrective actions," though it could not specify what those actions were. 

    "The conduct we discovered as a result of our investigation into this incident was entirely unacceptable and inconsistent with the values we share as human beings and as members of an academic community that espouses to live according to our Community Covenant," the statement read. "We are profoundly saddened that any member of our community could be mistreated in any way."

    Wheaton College has one of the top ranked Division 3 football programs in the nation. A varsity member of the school's football squad told NBC 5 the team was scheduled to have a meeting to discuss the charges against their teammates after a game Monday night.

    Students at the private Christian college told NBC 5 they're disappointed to hear the accusations.

    "I was just in the student center and there's a post on the wall that says: 'You know it has been a year since this happened, why haven't we heard about anything?'" said Wheaton College senior Drew English. "There's an anti-hazing policy in the student handbook--that's supposed to protect against things like this."

    The DuPage County Prosecutor's Office said the players could turn themselves in as early as Tuesday morning during bond court. Their bond has been set at $50,000. 

    Read the college's full statement below:

    "Wheaton College aspires to provide an educational environment that is not only free of hazing, but practices our values as a Christian community. As such, we are deeply troubled by the allegations brought by law enforcement against five members of our football team. When this incident was brought to our attention by other members of the football team and coaching staff in March 2016, the College took swift action to initiate a thorough investigation. Our internal investigation into the incident, and our engagement with an independent, third-party investigator retained by the College, resulted in a range of corrective actions. We are unable to share details on these disciplinary measures due to federal student privacy protections.

    "The College has fully cooperated with law enforcement in their investigation. To not impede the law enforcement investigation, the College was bound by confidentiality and unable to share more information until now.

    "The conduct we discovered as a result of our investigation into this incident was entirely unacceptable and inconsistent with the values we share as human beings and as members of an academic community that espouses to live according to our Community Covenant. We are profoundly saddened that any member of our community could be mistreated in any way. This incident has prompted our Board of Trustees to engage outside experts to lead a campus-wide review of the level of effectiveness of our anti-hazing policy and of the culture around how students treat one another in our campus communities, athletic teams, and organizations. Wheaton remains committed to providing Christ-centered development programs and training to all our students.

    "In 2014, we revised our anti-hazing policy and improved our training protocols to include a formal review of our anti-hazing policy with all student athletes every year, with required student signatures; we also require annual training for residence assistants who are responsible for residence hall activities. Despite these deeply troubling charges, we have experienced positive changes on campus, including rapid responses from campus leaders to reports of hazing or other inappropriate behavior and effective disciplinary review."



    Photo Credit: Wheaton College

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    Surveillance video supports an Oakland woman's report last week that a would-be robber handed her a threatening note, according to BART police.

    The woman, Julie Dragland, said she boarded a train in Daly City and was heading home to Dublin when a person in dark clothing climbed onto the train in downtown San Francisco and thrust a note at her. She said she faked a seizure to thwart the would-be robbery. 


    The note read: “There are 2 guns pointed at you now. If you want to live, hand back your wallet + phone NOW + do not turn around and be descreet [sic]. Do not turn around until after you have left Civic Center + you will live.”

    BART police Deputy Chief Lance Haight said Monday video from the train shows the suspect was seated behind the victim, who was sitting alone. The suspect, who was also alone, is then seen reaching over the victim’s shoulder, which is when the suspect may have dropped the note, Haight said.

     

    Dragland immediately pretended she was having a seizure. In response, the alleged suspect disembarked at the Powell Street BART station.

    There is no indication from the video the suspect was armed with any weapons.

    The victim said she was shaken up and will no longer sit on a BART seat with its back to other chairs behind it. Dragland, however, won’t let the frightening encounter stop her from riding BART trains altogether.

    Dragland doesn’t plan to press charges if the suspect is caught.

    BART is investigating the alleged crime and poring over surveillance footage. Although there were roughly 15 people in the BART train car, no one else reported the incident, police say.



    Photo Credit: BART PD
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    BART surveillance cameras captured a suspect who handed a rider a threatening note (inset) in an attempted robbery Friday. (Sept. 18, 2017)BART surveillance cameras captured a suspect who handed a rider a threatening note (inset) in an attempted robbery Friday. (Sept. 18, 2017)

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    A restaurant employee for Pieology was fired after allegedly typing an anti-police message on a Torrance officer's receipt on Thursday.

    A Facebook post shared Monday to Facebook denounced the message that read "F--- The Cops" on the unnamed Southern California officer's take out receipt.

    The post reads in full: "I want to share this with everyone to show the unprovoked hatred that my husband and his partners deal with everyday. This is not the type of business that I want to see in the city where I live. My husband's partner was just trying to get a quick bite to eat in the middle of a busy shift and this is what he received. Needless to say we will never eat at Pieology ever again. I hope you all will help support our police and share this both near and far. It is NOT ok to treat our officers like this."

    The Facebook post has since been shared more than 7,000 times and has garnered more than 2,000 comments.

    The officer, from the Torrance Police Department, stopped by the restaurant to have lunch and immediately noticed the message when he was given his receipt. The officer has not commented, but a spokesman said the department harbors no hard feelings against the restaurant.

    "He was very empathetic," said Sgt. Ronald Harris, of the Torrance Police Department. "What happened in the course of this individual's life for this to come to this?"

    The pizzeria apologized on behalf of the entire Pieology family for this "upsetting situation" in a statement shared with NBC4 Los Angeles.

    "The actions of this employee do not in any way reflect the thoughts of Pieology, and we have taken swift and serious action to rectify the situation, including terminating the offending employee. We have the utmost respect and gratitude for the men and women who keep our communities safe, and have no tolerance for hateful language or actions. This location in Torrance is a heartfelt supporter of all men and women in uniform, especially the brave first responders, and shows its support with a discount for all uniformed police, firefighters and military members."

    NBC4 spoke with customers at the restaurant Monday.

    "I don't think you should blame the restaurant because they don't have control over all of their workers," customer Charla Gae said.

    Another customer agreed.

    "It's probably a dumb kid who thought it was funny," Jason Hall said. "It wasn't funny so they got fired and they deserved it."



    Photo Credit: Leigh Ann

    A pizzeria employee was fired after allegedly typing an anti-police message on a Torrance officer's receipt at Pieology.A pizzeria employee was fired after allegedly typing an anti-police message on a Torrance officer's receipt at Pieology.

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    The frantic search for a 4-year-old girl missing from her mother's home in Southwest Philadelphia ended with hugs from family members Tuesday morning.

    NBC10 cameras captured the joyful reunion of Isabella Wiley with her family members around 8:45 a.m.

    Isabella's mother last saw her between 2 and 4 a.m. when she stepped out of their Bartram Village home to get some ice from a McDonald's store because she was hot, Philadelphia Police Lt. John Walker said. When the mother returned she went back to sleep in another room and didn't notice Isabella missing until later.

    Isabella had woken up and went outside looking for her mother, her grandfather told NBC10's Matt DeLucia.

    A neighbor spotted Isabella and took her in, Walker said. That neighbor later let everyone know the girl was safe in the neighbor's home. The neighbor, who has mental disabilities, won't be charged as she did the right thing taken the child in but she should have immediately contacted police, Walker said.

    The search focused on the area around Bartram Village at 56th Street and Lindbergh Boulevard around 7:30 a.m.

    About one dozen police vehicles could be seen around the complex as officers and K-9s searched on foot along some trails and wooded areas around nearby Bartram's Garden. A police search boat could also be seen on the nearby Schuylkill River.

    Police initially said Isabella is 3 but her family later said she is actually 4.



    Photo Credit: NBC10